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Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, start all over again!

From the day of the premiere of Merce last July, people have been asking when season 2 was coming out. The nerve! We’d barely put the show out, with all the creativity, guts and sweat that producing a musical comedy web series takes, and people were already demanding more. I guess that’s a good thing, right? I mean, better than the opposite, for sure. But Mama might say, Shoot, son! I went ‘n’ fixed you up a squirrel mousse pie, which you devoured like a li’l piglet, and now yer askin’ fer another!”

You know Mama's squirrel mousse pie is award winnin'!

You know Mama’s squirrel mousse pie is award winnin’!

When my producing partner Tyne Firmin and I started this Merce adventure, we had no idea what was in store or how we’d get the show even done. We were innocent in all things web series. Since then, we’ve not only produced an amazing show, but we were written up in a lot of publications, official selections in the Brooklyn Web Fest and the Austin Web Fest, and licensed for OUTtv in Europe. AND we’re in negotiations to have Merce licensed on a new LGBTQ app here in the states called REVRY. All amazing stuff.

When it came time to write the new season, I had a bit of writer’s block.  The truth is, I wasn’t sure where to take Merce next.  Dorothy Parker once wrote that “writing is the art of putting the ass to the seat,” but my ass wasn’t feeling it. 

Somewhere around February or March, my friend Cathy was in town, and we were at my favorite Chinese place, the Szechuan Gourmet on 39th Street, eating potstickers. We were talking about HIV, since she works in the medical field, and she brought up a cure.

A cure for HIV. Hard to admit, but the notion never even occurred to me. At least, not in a realistic way. I mean, Charlie Sheen may be cured with his Mexican goat milk injections, but no sane person’s buying it. As a person living with HIV, I’ve just gotten used to the fact that I’ll be on meds the rest of my life with what is now (miraculously) a chronic, manageable condition. The concept that I may some day be free of the virus is not an idea I’ve even entertained. Isn’t that awful? And sad? And that’s when I realized: a cure for AIDS/HIV is exactly the inspiration for Merce in season 2! Now, I’m not going to give away any plot points, but that idea is what got me writing, and we have scripts for 8 new fabulous episodes! Thanks, Cathy!

We’re also going to tackle such topics in season 2 as secondary conditions to HIV, serodiscordant relationships, PrEP, slut shaming, and gay marriage. It’s gonna be chock full, I tell ya! And a lot of favorite characters will be back for season 2, including (of course) Mama, Corvette, Remington, and the Fairies! And new characters, Merce’s Aunt Bless, Cousin Todd (the whore), and many more surprises along the way.

But life is not all rosey. It’s with a heavy heart that I tell you that composer/lyricist Kenny Kruper has parted ways with us for season 2. Sad news indeed. No hard feelings; we simply had some creative differences. We are totally grateful for the amazing work he did for season 1. Truly, Merce would not have had the magic and shine that is has without Kenny’s creativity, humor, hard work and fantastic skill. He will always be a valued member of our Merce family. Much love and luck to you, Kenny!

But when God closes a door…

We are happy to tell you that the amazing Rob Hartmann is coming on board as our new composer/lyricist. Rob is a super-creative, funny, sophisticated composer/lyricist, and someone that we were interested in working with for season 1. He was unavailable at the time, because he was moving to London (like ya do). He’s still there, but settled, and is happily joining our team from across the pond. Right now he’s teaching at the Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts (fancy), so we’ll be doing all the collaborating via internet and cell phone (we’re so modern, yo). You can find out more about Rob on his website: www.robhartmann.com. Welcome, Rob!

Rob Hartman and Charles

I was recently in Washington DC on some HIV advocacy business for the CDC (I’m fancy too), and Rob Hartmann happened to be in town at the same time–Miracle!

Our timeline for season 2 (tentatively) is to raise funds this summer, go into pre-production and rehearsals in August, record the music and solidify the team in September, and shoot in October. We’ll edit through the winter, and hopefully have a premiere in spring of 2017.

New logo with a subtle but important change.

New logo with a subtle but important change. (Thanks to Walter Harper for his design work!)

One last thing: we’ve changed the tag line for season 2. The former tag line, “Life can be positive even when you’re positive,” is good, but something about it was starting to bug me: the “even.” Sounds like an apology, and there’s nothing to apologize for. So, The new tag line is

“Life can be positive when you’re positive!”

Onward we go. Fresh squirrel pie not quite in the oven yet, but we do have a new recipe.
Besos,
Charles
P.S. We recently produced a short, fun video that we sent out to all our season 1 donors.
You can check it out here.  (Thanks to Rich Aronovich and Lucas Van Engen for helping us create the vid!)
P.P.S. I recently had an article about LGBTQ Pride published in the Huffington Post. It’s called I’ve Got My Pride, and if you missed it, please check that out, too.

Actor Spotlight: Andre Daquigan

I remember the first time I saw Andre Daquigan (who plays Marvello, one of Merce’s love interests). It was the sticky summer of 1987. I’d just moved to New York to go to the American Musical and Dramatic Academy, and there was a party on the roof of the Beacon Hotel, where some of the students lived. I was 19, illegally sipping on a cheap beer (or possibly a wine cooler?), and there was this mullet-haired Filipino dude sitting in the corner by himself with a guitar, playing “Is It Okay If I Call You Mine” from Fame. Well! I adored Fame at the time (still do–ask me to do my Coco Hernandez impersonation sometime), so I went over and sang with him a bit. In the next four semesters of school, Andre was often in his own world, juggling in the corner when we were supposed to be rehearsing. We nicknamed him, “The Weird One.” By the last semester of school, Dre and I were great friends and roommates. All these years later, he’s still my pal, and one of my favorite people to watch musicals with. A straight dude who loves Sondheim!

Andre Daquigan and me in front of GMHC for Merce

Andre Daquigan and me in front of GMHC for Merce

Meet this terrific guy, in his own words:

“I’m from the town of Milpitas, Ca. It is currently in the middle of Silicon Valley, but when I was growing up, it was still a sleepy little suburb surrounded by dusty green hills and orchards. I got my first taste of the stage performing a junior high school melodrama whose title escapes me. The one thing I remember clearly was that I spent the whole play disguised as an old woman, only to reveal myself as the long lost hero in the second act. Thunderous applause and hilarity ensued. Having brought the house down, its’ a wonder that was my only foray into drag.

“I arrived in New York City in 1987 to attend the American Musical and Dramatic Academy, or ‘SCAMDA’ as we students sometimes referred to it.

After graduation I had every intention of earning my chops performing on the classical stage. Wednesday mornings arrived and I circled every Shakespearean audition in Backstage. If a script had thee, thou or a wonton harlot in it, I vowed to be seen. Needless to say, I couldn’t get arrested.

Luckily, my skill set included being able to sing sixteen bars and do a semi-passable double pirouette. So began a decade of performing in the musical theatre.

“My twenties were spent traveling Europe and the U.S. in every combination of bus, truck and van that you can imagine. Performing in the European tour of HAIR was probably my favorite, but playing a Chinese railroad worker, a Mexican drug dealer and a mentally challenged scarecrow were just a few of the roles that paid the bills and kept me living out of a suitcase.

Andre in HAIR with hair.

Andre in HAIR with hair.

There comes a time in most performer’s lives when the siren song of stability calls. Fortunately when I decided to hang up my lucky audition mock-turtleneck and trade it in for another career, I had another life long passion waiting in the wings. Ever since I was a latch key kid starting dinner for my working mother, cooking good food had always been an obsession. This obsession became my second career as I learned to cook professionally and eventually graduated from the Culinary Institute of America.

“I did stints as diverse as working behind the scenes at the Food Network, working the line at the Four Seasons Hotel in NYC, being the personal chef for Harrison Ford’s family and teaching cooking classes in brownstone Brooklyn. As a chef I finally found my culinary home at God’s Love We Deliver.

Andre goofin' at God's Love

Andre goofin’ at God’s Love

“Charles asked those of us involved in Merce what our connection to HIV was. As a straight male actor working in the theatre I often felt like a minority in a bigger, more fabulous minority. In so many ways, it was through my gay friends and fellow performers that my ideas of humor, art and creativity were shaped. Many of them also taught me what it was to survive in the face of adversity. In the theatre world the specter of epidemic was never hypothetical. The front lines of the crisis were inherited by my generation, and its effects have been felt for my entire adult life. Friends have been lost, mourned and given tribute.

I started my involvement with God’s Love We Deliver as a volunteer between acting gigs. I told friends that no matter what kind of mood I was in, I always felt better after working my shift in the kitchen. God’s Love started in the mid 80’s feeding people suffering from HIV/AIDS. The organization has grown dramatically over the years. Its mission now is to improve the health of men, women and children living with HIV/AIDS, cancer and other serious illnesses by alleviating hunger and malnutrition. We prepare over a million meals a year to clients who are too sick to cook for themselves. Our services are provided free of charge. We believe that food is medicine, and that food prepared with love is essential in that healing. The volunteers I’ve worked with for almost fifteen years have helped teach me these lessons. Ask many of them their reasons for giving so much time and effort, and the echoes of lost loved ones ring clarion. Tribute is given through the making of food by many hands.

When Charles asked me to be a part of this project I balked a little at first. I hadn’t performed in years. There had to be younger, more handsome boys to play the role of Marvello. But then Charles said I’d always been his first choice and I could play it as big as I dared. He’d tell me when to rein it in. I immediately began channeling a combination of my mother and a gold digging chorus boy.

“As an actor, what’s more appealing than working with someone you trust and respect? Charles’ vision of Merce is at once timely and gut-bustingly funny, and his artistic life as a person with HIV has been an inspiration.

Andre with his wife Sarah and daughter Lily

Andre with his wife Sarah and daughter Lily (2012)

“The other night my wife and I were following our daughter’s co-ed and inclusive scout troop down Park Slope’s Fifth Avenue. The troop was marching for the third year in Brooklyn’s Gay Pride Parade. As the crowd cheered for the children in their uniforms, I felt in touch with a different sense of “pride.” It is my hope that my daughter’s generation will look at the bigotry of the past as a relic of history. It is my wish that they grow up to accept that love has many shapes, many voices, many faces and colors. It is in their acceptance for each other that we will find what’s best in our humanity.

Thanks, Chuck, for giving me acceptance and opportunity, and for allowing me to share in your creative vision.”

Thank you, Dre, for being a big-hearted man, a wonderful actor and a great  friend.

Besos,

Charles

Holy Headshots! Or, This SH*# is Setting My Therapy Back, Yo.

The first episode of Merce is coming out in about a month: July 16th.

And by the by, we’re featured in the June issue of A&U magazine! Fabulous! Check out page 52.

I’m nervous. Not about the show, I think Merce is going to be wonderful. But the show and the possibilities of it all is shaking me.

Here’s the thing: when I was young, I really believed in my  acting “talent.” I was kind of a big deal in AZ. I had my first agent when I was still in high school: L’Image Model and Talent Agency in Scottsdale. I remember when I got my very first headshots taken. Frankie Goes to Hollywood’s “Relax” was on the stereo, my hair was tragically parted down the middle (everyone’s was back then), and I was put into Nazi yoga-like poses with my body twisted this way and that, and told to look like I just landed in the chair that way! I was so uncomfortable. The shots were not great. I wasn’t much of a looker in high school, but still, I hope that photographer was fired.

L'Image Headshot

Headshot for L’Image Model and Talent Agency. Models even!

I moved in to New York in 1987 at 19 (“Three bucks! Two bags! One me!”), and wholly presumed that I had what it took to be a successful New York actor. Most of my success was as a waiter. Looking back, I had some triumphs: I had an agent and a manager, I booked a smattering of work, a little this-n-that theater. I even did a commercial for Western Beef Stores where they dumped raw meat on my head! It’s a glamorous life.

Throughout my time as a young actor, I had many, many headshots taken. I had bargain shots, I had artsy shots, I had shots taken by the “it” celeb photographer, spending thousands of dollars as time ticked by, hoping to get the one photo that would magically get me that job that would change my life. Spending money on headshots was an investment in hope, in the belief in the dream, that I really was talented and special.

Circa 1994 or 1995-ish

Circa 1994 or 1995-ish

After eleven years of pursuing a career as a professional actor, tons of auditions, chorus calls, callbacks, keeping up the belief that I was going to make it as a performer, I quit the business of show. It was pretty traumatic.

Looking back, there was one incident that sealed the deal for me. I’d auditioned for this movie, and I knew I’d done well. The casting director told my agent that they wanted me, but couldn’t hire me because I wasn’t SAG. Then the guy they offered the part to wasn’t available, so they offered it to me. Then they took it away to hire someone SAG. Then they were going to give me the part and make me SAG. Then no, and they’re going to hire someone else. This yes and no crap went on for about a week, when finally my agent called to tell me that they wish they’d used me in the film, since I was so much better than the guy they hired. That’s when it hit me: it doesn’t matter what I do, or how hard I work, or how good I am. I’m just not the guy who gets hired. My heart broke. The dream was over.  I left New York in 1998.

Across the years, I’ve clawed my way to rediscovering my artist self. I found work as a theater teacher in L.A., as a musical director for a dinner theater in Little Rock, AR, I did community theater, I took writing classes. I made my way back to New York eight years ago, and I’ve realized that I’m a performer whether the industry cares or not. I’m a writer, I’m a director, I’m a musician.

So here we are, all these years later, and I’ve written this web series, Merce. And Tyne and I are producing it. And people are starting to take notice about it. there’s fantastic possibility about what might happen when the show is released. It’s wonderful. I have great hopes for Merce. I believe in him.

If Merce is successful, there’s potential that something terrific could happen for me as a result of the show, as an actor, as a writer, who knows? But putting faith in that potential, in that possibility, is really difficult. Hard to go back to the lover that kicked you out of bed.

As part of putting together a press pack, we need to include photos of Tyne and me. Professional headshots and editorial photos. Ugh. The idea of getting pictures taken made me feel vomitous. I kept thinking about all those headshots across all those years, and the death of the dream of that young actor that I used to be. I had to dig really deep to find the hope that it’s worth the money to have these things taken.

DSC_0436

Rick Stockwell is a genius.

This week, I bit the bullet, and did it: I got pictures taken. The fabulous and charming Rick Stockwell took the shots on the roof of my building, and they’re wonderful. No Nazi yoga-esque poses this time! He completely put me at ease, and we laughed a lot. And so many of the pics came out great. I look at these new shots, and I think I look like a hopeful New York actor. That’s pretty terrific.

I don’t know what the future holds. It could be that I get famous. It could be that nothing happens. But I have to choose to have optimism about it all, to believe that no matter what happens, I’m still an artist.

And I think that the 17 year old me in those L’Image shots would think 47 year old me is kinda awesome.

Besos,

Charles

Artist Spotlight: Musical Director Michael Forman

I’ve said often that Merce is a family. Some people in the company are like my favorite cousins, some more like crazy Aunt Melba who forgets to take her medicine. Bless her heart.

While most family members are new, I’ve been friends with co-producer and Merce’s Mama Tyne Firmin for 25 years. We met as cater waiters. (Tragic, to be sure, but I have a host of friends I met that way. And Tyne still works there!) I’ve been friends with Andre Daquigan, who plays the scheming Marvello, for 28 years. Andre and I met when we were students together at the American Musical and Dramatic Academy. That’s some long-ass family, yo!

But Michael wins. Michael Forman has been a member of my family the longest of anyone in the company of Merce. We’ve been friends for 29 years, since we first met as chorus boys in a production of Guys and Dolls at Musical Theater of Arizona. In one scene, I distinctly remember Michael as a dancing Cuban waiter. It’s burned in my memory.

The Guys and Dolls guys. I'm kneeling in the front (r), and Michael is standing far right, next to the guy doing Fiddler on the Roof.

The Guys and Dolls guys. I’m kneeling in the front (left), and Michael Forman is standing behind me, third row, far left, next to the guy doing Fiddler on the Roof.

Actually, Michael and I didn’t really get along when we first met. We had a prickly relationship, and not in the fun way. It wasn’t until we were both in New York that our friendship really began. I was directing this little cabaret revue (which Tyne happened to be involved in) and needed a musical director. An adorable co-worker, Paul McCullough, recommended his boyfriend, “but you don’t like him,” he said. It was Michael. The show was in desperate need of a musical director, so I swallowed my pride and gave him a call. Michael and I had a coffee and put our prickly feelings behind us. He musical directed the show and we’ve been dear friends ever since.

Michael Forman was bit by the musical theater bug (The venomous Merman flea, I call it), when he was in the 7th grade in Wilmette, IL. “It was called Silver Screen and my starring moment was as Inspector Jacques Clouseau.” He went on to a fantastic high school which had an amazing theater program, and Michael played piano for his first production, Anything Goes, at 15.

His family then moved to Scottsdale, AZ (lucky for me, otherwise we might never have met). “I was too big for my britches living in AZ.” After his life-changing experience of meeting me in G & D (and going to Arizona State for two years), he had to move to NY.

He studied musical theater performance at AMDA, then decided to move away from performing, and studied composition at the Mannes College of Music of The New School. He then was offered a musical direction job, which led to a lot of regional theater and the national tour of Annie and The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas.

Michael went on to have a successful music studio, coaching professional singer/actors, both celebrities and aspiring young artists. He also took jobs in academia including being a musical theater performance teacher at The Yale Graduate School of Drama. “Watching my students/clients go on to achieve their dreams, do the Broadway thing, and find their way to the red carpet at the Tony Awards still gives me happy tears.”

And then Merce. Michael likes to say that he was honored to be asked to be involved in the project. The truth is, I kidnapped him. I didn’t even ask if he’d be interested in musical directing, I just said, “oh by the way, rehearsals start Monday and here’s the score.” Poor guy didn’t know what he was in for. Drag queens, Dominatrix/Life coaches and fairies, oh my!

But he’s a pro. Truth is, the Merce music recordings wouldn’t have any of the sparkle or panache they have without Michael’s guiding hand. He took Kenny Kruper’s amazing songs and made each singer in the cast sound like a million bucks. Even me. (For proof, just go to www.MerceTV.com and listen to the trailer with your eyes closed. The company sounds amazing!)

The fantastically talented and dear Michael Forman, conducting Merce in the recording studio.

The fantastically talented and dear Michael Forman, conducting Merce in the recording studio.

“I’m incredibly pleased with the work all of the artists in the project that I got to collaborate with,” Michael said. “Merce is a remarkable combination of intelligent writing and includes drama, comedy, musical theater fantasies and romance. It’s never been done before, and I believe people will flock to it.”

Michael went on, “I’m am thrilled to help kick the AIDS stigma by being involved in Merce. I believe that whether it’s theater or film or TV, there is a duty to educate people about society and the world. Love should not be hindered by stigma.

You said it, Michael. So grateful to have you as part of Merce‘s family, and part of my own.

And just to be clear: Michael is part awesome cousin, part crazy Aunt Melba. I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Besos,

Charles

P.S. Michael is not just anti-HIV stigma, he’s also against stigma for other conditions, most importantly depression and mental illness. Much work yet needs to be done to fully understand the breadth and scope of prejudice against people with mental illnesses. For more information, visit Project Helping.

 

Actor Spotlight: Randy Taylor

When Randy Taylor came in to audition for the role of Remington (one of Merce’s love interests), Tyne and I were so happy! He can sing, he can act, and he’s certainly swoon-worthy. We were pretty much sold on him right away.

Randy headshot

The almost-too-handsome Randy Taylor

Randy remembers the experience a little differently: “I was put through a grueling set of auditions by Tyne and Charles. They made me do all this crazy stuff! Did everyone have to run naked around the block screaming ‘Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina?'”

Well, however it happened, Randy was the perfect choice to play Remington, a cute guy from Long Island who went to high school with Amy Fisher.

Randy grew up on a cattle ranch in the Southern California desert, just miles from the Mexican border. “Everything there is beige,” Randy said, “It is very, very conservative as well. Just imagine a slice of Texas transplanted to California.” Beige was too, well, beige for Randy, so as soon as he could, he packed up and moved to Los Angeles to fail out of managerial accounting at USC. He wisely switched majors to acting, “and I’ve been having fun ever since!”

Randy moved to New York twenty years ago, and he’s been seen in musicals and cabarets in the city as well as regionally. Like a lot of performers, he also slings drinks. “I am a bartender at the (in)famous Marie’s Crisis, ‘where showtunes go to die,'” Randy said. “It’s such a fun place and I am often astounded that I get paid to be there.”

Randy Taylor as Reminton, cannoli in hand

Randy Taylor as Remington, cannoli in hand

The first day Randy was on set for Merce, the scene was a date between Merce and Remington. “I was so nervous on my first day of shooting,” Randy said, “but within minutes I was having a wonderful time pretending to eat pasta and clowning around with Charles. I thought to myself that I would happily do this for the rest of my life. Plus the crew was just amazing!”

Besides being fantastically talented, Randy is a genuinely nice guy, and he’s one dreamy fella to boot. One of the fun things for me was that I got to make googly-eyes at him for the camera. Trust me, it was easy. I kept my cool, though, since Randy’s got a super-cute, super-nice boyfriend named David. Ain’t that always the way.

Randy Taylor as Remington with Merce at Washington Square Park

Randy Taylor as Remington with Merce at Washington Square Park

Randy talked about his connection to HIV and Merce: “I have a number of friends who are poz. I remember the fear that was instilled into us about AIDS in the 80’s and how gays were bringing this plague to the nation. We’ve come a long way, baby. Still have a ways to go too! I feel so thrilled to be a part of a show involving HIV characters. I think this kind of show is needed to break through the stigma of having HIV. So, so proud to be a part of it all.”

And we’re proud that you are a part of the Merce family. Now would you mind getting naked again? I’d love to hear another chorus of “Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina!”

[Note about the name Remington: The character was originally named Parker. When Tyne and I were fundraising for the project, one of our donors, Gayle Slifka, made a donation in the memory of her dear brother, Remington. In his honor, we decided to re-name the character after him.]

The Real Remington

The Real Remington

Besos,

Charles

Actor Spotlight: Ryan Daniel Pater

I have some bad news for you. Criminally handsome and terrifically talented Ryan Daniel Pater is…okay, he’s…..it pains me to say it, but….he’s not gay. I KNOW! Isn’t that awful? I’m disappointed, too. And don’t you straight gals start lining up, because he’s taken. “I’ve got a lovely lady who could easily leave me in the dust,” he says. “That’s what I love about her.” Blighted hope, all the way around.

Yummy Ryan Daniel Pater

Yummy Ryan Daniel Pater

We all can find solace in watching him partially dressed (sometimes) as the he’s-not-a-porn-star-but-he-totally-looks-like-one therapist Billy in Merce. We were lucky to find Ryan, after another talented actor had to drop out because of a personal emergency. Gonzalo Rodriguez (who plays Dr. Biederhof’s receptionist in Episode 2) recommended Ryan, and he was just what we were looking for: handsome, warm, talented, and with a willingness to get partially naked. “Shooting Merce was an amazing time,” Ryan said, “the story is important, fun, and 100% original.”

Ryan Daniel Pater as the therapist, Billy

Ryan Daniel Pater as Merce’s therapist, Billy

Ryan grew up in Chapel Hill, NC, and started performing in middle school. “I played Robin Starveling in  A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Things really picked up from there.” He said that “a pack of lies” brought him to New York (join the club!), but he didn’t say what the lies were or who told them to him. That’s okay: I like a little mystery.

I did a little digging, and found out that after graduating from University of North Carolina School of the Arts, he scurried up to NYC to begin the Kenan Fellowship at Lincoln Center Education. As a Kenan Fellow he conceived and directed The Wizard of Odd that solidified his desire to create a company with those that are brimming full of love, inspiration, and the desire to create what has never been.

Ryan is Co-Artistic Director of the Oh Force! Theatre Co., a brand new Brooklyn based theatre company striving to produce new and entirely original work. They are dedicated to being a safe haven for artists who value collaboration above all else.  (I recently saw their production of Daisies. Called “a sickly sweet comedy about death,” it was one of the most creative, fresh, modern and funny shows I’ve seen in quite a while. And it had a TON of music in it, which you know I adored.)

Ryan Daniel Pater: he does look like a porn star, no?

Ryan Daniel Pater: he does look like a porn star, no?

Ryan is also a teaching artist with two lovely organizations, ENACT and S.A.Y. (The Stuttering Association for the Young), where, he says “the youth of NYC are a nonstop inspiration.” If that weren’t enough to keep him busy, Ryan also plays with the band Lion and Spaniel. (Listen here: https://soundcloud.com/lionandspaniel)

Prior to joining the Merce family, Ryan had no direct connection to the HIV community. “Now that I do, ” he said, “I want the world to know that positive or negative, they are positively beautiful.”

Well, Ryan, you’re beautiful. Both inside and out.

To find out more information about the Oh Force! Theatre Company, check out the website at www.ohforcetheatreco.com.

Besos,

Charles

 

Actor Spotlight: Amanda Bruton

What is there to say about the delightful and lovely Amanda Bruton? She’s an amazingly talented and fearless performer. She’s wickedly funny. She’s got a great rack. Qualities that we were looking for in an actress to play the part-time life coach, part-time dominatrix Veda Masters/Mistress Veda, to be sure. But with Amanda, we got all that and a whole lot more. When Amanda came in to try out for Merce, she bowled Tyne and me over with her hilarious audition. “I really just wanted to play with whips and chains,” Amanda said, “lucky for me, Charles and Tyne agreed and I booked the role.”

Fabulous and Boobalicious Amanda Bruton

Fabulous and Boobalicious Amanda Bruton

Like Bess Eckstein (who plays Merce’s roommate Corvette), Amanda is a Jersey girl (another one? sheesh!). “I grew up there, and to this day I’m a Jersey girl through and through,” she said. “I still drive stick and comb my hair with a pick, as Jersey girls do.” (I’m not sure what ‘driving stick’ is, but it sounds like something I’ve tried once or twice.)

She caught the acting bug early on. “From a young age I was incredibly melodramatic, but also a total ham.” She was in her first show at age 5, and, as she puts it, “a diva was born.” (I can relate, honey!) She also got to see a lot of Broadway shows and did a lot of community theater, which got her into a high school with an incredible arts program, leading her to NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, and New York.

Amanda as the bumbling life coach, Veda Masters

Amanda as the bumbling life coach, Veda Masters

“I’ve been living and working as an actor in NYC for over a decade now. My career has run the gamut: straight plays, musicals, Shakespeare, experimental work, voice-overs, film, television, sketch comedy and improv,” Amanda said. “Recently, I tap danced in a mullet and a tutu, and it wasn’t even ironic.” (That’s my kind of actress!)

For Amanda, the highlight of her career so far was playing Grandma Addams on the international tour of The Addams Family Musical. “I know what you’re thinking,” she said, “how could this young spring chicken play a 102-year-old Grandma? And the answer is: a lot of heavy make-up and a lot of late nights!”

Fierce Amanda as Mistress Veda (with Mike Dewhirst and Bess Eckstein)

Fierce Amanda as Mistress Veda (with fellow Jersey-ites Mike Dewhirst and  Bess Eckstein)

“Working on Merce was ridiculously fun. Everyone from the cast to the crew to the creators were fabulous,” Amanda said. “They all had the perfect combination of professionalism, humor, and BAWDINESS. Not to mention talent.”

Amanda as Veda, singing her soul out

Amanda as Veda, singing her soul out

She went on, “I was thrilled to be working on a show about HIV. I believe that one of the best ways to address serious issues is with humor and laughter. A lot of Americans forget that AIDS is still a problem, as if it were a trend that died in the 90’s. While it’s true that HIV is no longer a death sentence and many people with HIV are living happy and full lives, it is imperative that we find a cure. We need to bring it back to the forefront of the American public’s consciousness.”

And as for the future of Merce? “I hope that Merce can give a new face to HIV,” Amanda said. “I hope that with humor and laughter and maybe a couple of dildos and penis straws we can make this issue relatable. And I hope it makes us all really rich and famous.”

FROM YOUR MOUTH TO GOD’S EARS, AMANDA.

For more things Amanda, including video clips of her work, visit her website at www.amandabruton.com.

Besos,

Charles

Actor Spotlight: Tom Shane

We first met talented Tom Shane when he came to audition for Merce at the Players Theatre studios. “I remember walking up to this dingy upstairs theatre in the West Village and wondering what I had got myself involved in! But you know,” Tom said, “you can always walk out a door after you walk in, so I walked in.”

Charming Actor Tom Shane

Charming Actor Tom Shane

And we’re so glad he did! In Merce, Tom plays the eccentric and dogmatic Bible Guy, who assaults innocent subway riders with his warped views on Jesus and the bible. We were looking for an actor with just the right balance of kookiness and likability, and Tom hit the nail on the head with his hilarious audition.

We shot his scenes gorilla-style on the subway, without official permission from the city (although we checked it out; it’s not illegal to film on the subway). “It was very exciting,” Tom said, “we’d jump on train cars, shoot a quick scene and jump off at the next stop. My favorite part was when a business man came up to us after we shot a scene and said to me, ‘I was gonna sock you one until I realized what was going on!’ I figured we were doing some good work!”

Tom grew up in Scarsdale. He claims it’s pretty there. (I worked a bar mitzvah there once, but I blocked it out.) Then he moved to Colorado to go to college, and ended up staying there for twenty-ish years, pursuing the life of a mountain bum. “That’s where I started performing. I auditioned for  Richard III for the local community theatre company, and I did not get cast. Fortunately, someone dropped out and I was brought on.”

He was bit by the acting bug, and came back to New York to study improv at UCB. He spent a little time shuttling back and forth between NY and CO before deciding to study acting seriously in NY. “I went to a conservatory program at The Studio/New York, which was my greatest life-changing event, an education as to how to be a human being.”

Tom counts among his career highlights a show he performed called Squids Live! which was totally ridiculous, took place underwater, all the actors played cephalopods (look it up, kids), and performed at the Sheridan Opera House in Telluride, CO. He also performed in a clown show called WAKE UP! in the small town, and felt embarrassed seeing all his friends and acquaintances around town after making an ass out of himself on stage. But, Tom said, “I knew then I was onto something good.”

Tom Shane as the Bible Guy, damning sinners to hell!

Tom Shane as the Bible Guy, damning subway sinners to hell!

Tom also considers his work on Merce a highlight. “I’m so glad that the show is fun and campy. The world is filled with horror and the greatest challenge is to take a heavy subject and make it fun. There is not enough laughter and joy in the world, and if Merce is psyched, you should be, too!

Tom is now living it up in Hollywood, CA. I hope he doesn’t become too big a star, daaling, in case we produce a season 2!

Besos,

Charles

Feeling Topsy-Turvy

Things is crazy in my world right now, y’all. Upside down, inside out and round and round.

I’m fitfully sleeping about 5 or 6 hours per night, when normally I’m a hard snorin’, solid 7 or 8 hour boy. I’m totally a coffee dude, but lately I’ve taken to having a civilized cup of decaffeinated Lady Grey Tea in the evenings. Yes, I said Lady Grey. I feel a little like I’m in a fog all the time. I’ve lost a little weight, too. It’s all due to mourning my Father’s death. Turns out, grief is a great diet (better than TrimSpa, baby!), but I don’t recommend it.

Merce in a pensive moment.

Merce in a pensive moment.

Don’t worry, Mom. I’m eating, I’m just not craving burgers, french fries, pizza, brownies, buttercream and the like. Basically, I’m not eating anything delicious. Nothing sounds good, so I’m basically eating chicken and veggies. Salad. Yogurt. Fruit. Tragic, right?

The grief’s also kicked up emotions around other losses in my life– my pitiful career; the comedy of errors that’s been my love life; the black molly fishies who started eating each other in my fish tank when I was 10. They were eating each other! It was horrifying. All of it has made me feel helpless, hopeless and useless. It’s awful.

And it’s colored how I’ve been feeling about Merce. It seems like we’re never going to get the show out. It’s never going to be done. And what’s the use, anyway? Who the fuck cares?

But we’ve made a commitment, and must see it through. There are other people involved, donors, cast, crew, a few fans all wanting to see the show. So I take a deep breath, and shoulder on.

It’s been making me crazy how long the editing has been taking. After consulting with our consultant, the ever-patient Tyne Firmin and I decided to have a come-to-Jesus meeting with editor Johnny Coughlin about the state of the editing and the fact that we didn’t have an ending to the project in sight. Tyne and I strategized about the best possible way to have the conversation, coming up with plans A, B, and C, trying to figure out the best ways to approach Johnny, valuing as we do his talent and time, but being firm on the need to have a deadline. Producer problem solving.

What the magic of editing can do: Mama (Tyne Firmin) Skyping to Merce.

What the magic of editing can do: Mama (Tyne Firmin) Skyping with Merce.

We had a meeting of the three of us, and when Tyne and I approached the topic and told Johnny that we were unhappy with the timing of things and needed to implement an editing schedule, he without hesitation agreed. AGREED! And when I pulled out the schedule I’d already made up (sometimes I’m sneaky), he said it looked totally reasonable for him and the other two editors he’s brought on to the project to adhere to. The meeting was shockingly un-dramatic. Sometimes when you have a come-to-Jesus meeting, Jesus shows up first. 

Fabulous Amanda Bruton as the bumbling Veda Masters

Fabulous Amanda Bruton as the bumbling Veda Masters

We have about 98% of Episode 1 completed, and have 2 other episodes at about 85% completion. And guess what? They’re totally fresh, exciting and AMAZING. Kenny Kruper, who we were already in love with from the songs he’s composed, added scoring to Ep. 1 that is perfect! Amanda Bruton is hilarious and heroic as Mistress Veda/Veda Masters. Ed Davis as Ms. Nutella Spread is so freakin’ glamorous and smashing, you won’t believe it. And the rest of the cast! Corvette, the Joes, my darling Fairies! Oh! It’s all being brought to life by Johnny and his team of Max Nitch and Billy Coughlin (Johnny’s bro), under Tyne’s guidance, putting everything together with such care, humor, and panache, getting every silly joke just right. It’s really wonderful, and makes me cry to think of how fabulous the whole show is going to be.

Ed Davis as Ms. Nutella Spread with my fairies (Rob Laqui, Alex Tomas and Sean Griffin)

Ed Davis as Ms. Nutella Spread with my fairies (Rob Laqui, Alex Tomas and Sean Griffin)

Our schedule right now has us finishing editing by mid-June. Hopefully before that, we’ll be able to figure out a marketing plan and decide on a release date.

As for my grief, well, the turvy’s not so easily re-topsy’d. I’ve never grieved anyone like this before, and it’s hard. My Dad was an amazing man with a great sense of humor, and a huge heart. I’m in therapy, attending a grieving group, even using crystals.  (Natures jewelry, darling, and they have powers!)

Merce has been helping. Every naughty, bawdy episode has a message of hope, joy, love, and believing in yourself. Turns out, Merce is a very positive influence on me. 

And I’m starting to feel a tad bit better. Who knows? I may even have a burger this weekend.

Besos,

Charles

P.S.  I was on the Laff Tracks Radio Show on Feb. 28, hosted by the fabulous Joanna Briley and the hilarious Steve C. King. If you missed it, you can watch the recorded stream here (with a few commercials): http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/59368068, or listen to the podcast at http://floempireradio.com/lafftrackspodcast/. I’m on for about a half hour starting at around 34-ish minutes in. I talk about Merce, HIV, life, love, sex even! Oh, and burritos. Check it out!

Sometimes God’s Sense of Humor Pisses Me Off

“Hey, Charles, How’s your web series thing going?”

“Seems like you’ve been working on Merce forever! What’s up with the show?”

“That trailer was a hoot; I can’t wait to see the series. When’s it coming out?”

Well, kids. Hmm. Hate to break it to ya, but this isn’t going to be the sunny happy joy-joy blog post from me that you’re used to. Here are my answers to the above questions.:

The web series thing? It’s going very frustratingly.

It totally feels like we’ve been working on Merce forever. Not much is up with the show. 

And here’s the hardest answer to give: I have no idea when the series will be out. None. Seriously.

It’s totally making me crazy, angry, frustrated, suicidal (except not really suicidal, because I’m not like that, but something dramatic and emotional, with a hair flip and a cigarette). We said that we’d have the show out in Spring of 2015, and here we are in mid-Feb with little to show for it. I pride myself on being a man of my word, and this is freaking my shit out.

God.laughing.at.our.plans

When we completed shooting, our DP/Editor Johnny Coughlin assured us that he could edit about one episode per week. On that schedule (plus some grace time, give or take a week), we figured we’d be completely done editing by now, and half way through composer Ken Kruper’s scoring of each episode. At that rate, being out by Spring sounded like cake, baby!

Well, that’s not how it’s happening.

Johnny didn’t realize how complicated the editing would be, and it’s taking A LOT longer than we anticipated. Syncing all the sound files, color correcting, movie magic, it’s all a complex operation! Apparently, the idiot writer created ideas that weren’t just 1-2-3. And poor Johnny has to eat and pay rent ‘n’ all, so he has to work other jobs that take him away from Merce. AND every now and again he has to go home to bang his girl and sleep a bit. We all understand that. He has enlisted the aid of 2 assistants to help (with the editing, not the banging), but even with their help, the editing is just going to take the time it takes.

I’d much rather it happened at my schedule. I want it when I want it!  But God says, “HA!” I’ve said all along that it seems like this project is happening without me. It was easy to believe that there was some glorious kumbaya hocus pocus happening when things were going amazingly smooth. I have to trust that the same blessed mojo is still guiding the project, that the Divine Wow has it all under control. I have to believe that Merce will come out when it’s supposed to.

(OMYGOD, I just said that Merce would come out! As if he were ever in!!)

So far, episode one is pretty magical. With Tyne Firmin’s guidance,  Johnny is editing the show to be energetic and fun, and the musical number is bright and hilarious. Bess Eckstein as Corvette is a natural for the sit-com genre, and Randy Taylor as Remington is dreamy and charming. Tyne’s Mama is going to run away with the show, and even the funny-looking guy playing the lead has some really nice moments. I just can’t stand to look at his face.

In coolness news, I’m going to be on the Laff Tracks Radio Show on Saturday, February 28th. The show is on www.FLOEmpireradio.com from 1-3pm EST, hosted by the fabulous Joanna Briley. I think I’ll be on around 1:30, talking about Merce and trying to be funny. So tune in!

Coming Soon

I’m sorry that I’m not doing split jumps and cartwheels in this blog. I have a really shitty attitude. Hard for me to have faith that things are happening the way they should. But they are. And I still think that it’s going to be an amazing show.

Someday.

Besos,

Charles

P.S. Merce‘s Line Producer Samantha Slater and Art Director Darian Brenner are working on a fabulous short film project, SIBS. Follow the link to the info, and donate if’n ya can to help them make this a reality! I did. http://tinyurl.com/pkqgrs8